Posts Tagged ‘wordpress’

Site Update

technology

Cleaned up that footer. The one that said “welcome to 2009!” That’s fixed.

Only took a smidgen of code:

&copy; 2008-<?php echo date("Y"); ?>

Now my footer will be working and functional long after I’m dead and gone. Yay!

[Tip]

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Comment, sucker!

I ruin worlds (and something about WordPress)

technology

If you can read this, then you have the ability to read. Thank a teacher or something.

And if you can read this and you are using a web browser, then thank the browser–maker people and the folks that make WordPress. Because that’s what you’re looking at. WordPress.

Unless I’ve changed it to something else, and you are reading this in the future. If you are in the future, what’s it like? We got flying cars yet? Seriously, I wants me a flying car, and I wants it right now.

Or…a robot servant. One that won’t backtalk.

Makes me sandwiches.

I want a sandwich.

Anyways, the site now runs on WordPress. Continue the rest of your lives as usual.

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Comment, sucker!

So, that bad idea I was going on about

technology

Just thought I’d let you know, it’s back on like Donkey Kong! Yep, I’m back to going back to going back to the drawing board. Again. This time for reals — I’m being totally cereal, you guys.

Plus, I’ll have a nifty GPL–ed WordPress theme that looks just like this site! So you too can steal my theme and fill it full of crap I’d never use. Like TrackBacks, or lots of ads, or pictures of cats, or…comments.

Point being, soon I’ll be transitioning this site back to WordPress (part 5).

Good times, good times.

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Comment, sucker!

So, I had this idea about WordPress…

technology

Back in 2006, I had this nifty idea to jettison comments. First of all, they added little to the immediate subject. Also, I didn’t like the compromises I had to choose from with either anonymity or registration. The more popular my site became, the harder it was to police…unless there was nothing to police.

That led to be put together my site sans commentary. It seemed like it made sense at the time, so I went with it. First I was using TextPattern (and I still keep that thing around, somewhere — I love it). But I went with WordPress. And I turned the comment off. Permanently.

I guess my decision was based on a combination of hype and contempt. WordPress was just getting exciting, with the new version 2.0 starting to hit its stride. Messing with templates was just enough to keep me interested, and to make a site that worked just how I wanted. Not having to style comments, or figure out how to con people into registering was refreshing.

It wasn’t long, however, before I started to find the problems with the platform. While the system works well as a one–blog producer, it really isn’t that complete as a full–site solution. Plus, to get it to do anything, you needed a plugin.

While I found ways to work around the limitations, I kept on running into the same problem over and over again: why am I making the server do all that work on a page that almost never changes? That was the whole point of moving to Movable Type — to cut down on server load for a resource–light site.

It’s funny now seeing the other blogs that are buying into my 2006 philosophy. I got over that earlier this year, when I decided to be more of who I really am. That, and to interact with who I know you are (or don’t know, I guess). Now I’m all about the comments and the peoples. And I think I’m ready for my soapbox…

Movable Type soapbox

As a sidenote, this is just me telling anyone that’s gearing up for my comments–less WordPress experience: have you thought of just writing the HTML yourself? I mean, it’d make your server happy, plus you’d learn a new skill!

But for those of you who don’t want to cook it yourself, there’s always Movable Type. It will make the pages work exactly the same while allowing just as many comments. Plus, you can stick it to the man (if you’re really all that against–the–man–y).

As another added benefit, you’ll get the pleasure of answering, “well, have you even tried WordPress?” about 50 times a week. That’s always a reassuring way to let you know that people know what they’re talking about.

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